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Avista Stadium



Park Name: Avista Stadium
Tenants: Spokane Indians (Northwest League)

Opened: 1958
Address: 602 North Havana Street, Spokane Valley, Washington 99212
Dimensions: 331' (L), 398' (C), 296' (R)

Former Names:
Fairgrounds Ballpark (1958-1993)
Seafirst Stadium (1994-1999)

Former Tenants:
Spokane Indians (Pacific Coast League) 1958-1971
Spokane Indians (Northwest League) 1972
Spokane Indians (Pacific Coast League) 1973-1982
Gonzaga University Bulldogs (NCAA Division 1) 2004-2006


The view from behind home plate at Avista Stadium.


The view from down the first base line.


The view from down the third base line.


The grandstand at Avista Stadium, as seen from the right field corner of the park.


The pressbox sits on top of the grandstand roof, with a basic manual scoreboard on the front of it.


The lower part of the seating bowl is broken into 4 seat boxes, with the first row of boxes featuring removable seats.


Above the walkway the seating bowl features standard stadium seating. Open air luxury suites sit at the top of the grandstand.


The Diamond Club group seating area sits at the top of the stands behind home plate.


Bleachers sit at the ends of the grandstand with concession stands built into the seating and the Indians "Rim of Honor" running along the top of the stands.


An open seating area down the right field line features picnic tables and removable seats.


The Pepsi Porch group seating area overlooks the right field wall at Avista Stadium.


A railroad caboose sits behind the outfield fence and now acts as a unique bar.


The Indians batting cages sit on the outfield concourse, in open view of fans walking by.


A Whiffle Ball field sits on the concourse at Avista Stadium.


The main concourse, behind the grandstand.


A covered picnic area sits in the entry plaza on the concourse.


Plaques on the concourse wall celebrate former Spokane Indians who have made the major leagues with Texas, as well as the teams championship victories.


Signage at the park is both in English and Salish, the language of the local indigenous Spokane tribe.


Avista Stadium is over 60 years old but is well maintained, including extensive landscaping behind the grandstand.


The ballpark is part of the Interstate Fairgrounds complex and fairgrounds buildings are visible beyond the left field corner.


The bullpens sit in foul territory in the outfield corners.


The right field wall is significantly shorter than the rest of the outfield fence, and the porch seating area juts into the field of play.


The scoreboard sits above the right-center field wall.


The Spokane Indians on the field during a game at Avista Stadium.




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